Is Obesity “Hardwired” In Our Brains

I don’t think that people are programmed to be overweight.

This post from WebMD.com gives the reader this impression that obesity is something your born with. Like it’s something in your genes, like the color of your eyes, but I can’t agree with that. I think your food cravings that you carry with you for life start when you first learn to eat table food.  When your only a few months old what your given to eat programs you for the future and those eating habits that you create as a child will carry with you throughout your life. But that doesn’t mean you can’t change. This post simply explains what happens to most people, it doesn’t mean that this is what’s  happening to you; merely what can happen.

By Tim Locke, Reviewed by Michael W. Smith, MD on September 01, 2015
Sept. 1, 2015 — Some people become obese because their cravings for food are built-in, according to new research.

Australian and Spanish research teams came to their conclusions using MRI brain scans to investigate people’s responses to pictures of food. They found that a food craving activates different brain networks in obese people compared to those at a normal weight.

More than one-third of U.S. adults are considered obese.

Researchers say the risk of obesity may be tied to the brain, which could also explain why some people have more trouble losing weight and sticking to diets.

Other studies have suggested that the way the brain responds to food in some obese people is similar to alcohol or drug addiction, the researchers say. Teams from the University of Granada in Spain and Monash University in Australia gave buffet food to 39 obese people and 42 with normal weights.

They were then given a functional or real-time MRI brain scan while being shown pictures of the food to stimulate food cravings.  Specific activity was observed in different parts of the brain that appeared to be related to the person’s weight category.

In the obese group, there was greater connectivity between the dorsal caudate and the somatosensory cortex — parts of the brain that are associated with rewards, habits, and high-calorie food. In the normal-weight group, though, there was a greater connectivity between different parts of the ventral putamen and the orbitofrontal cortex of the brain that are linked with decision-making. About 11% of the weight gain and body mass index (BMI) changes 3 months later could be predicted from the brain scans in some of the obese people.

Food Addiction
“There is an ongoing controversy over whether obesity can be called a ‘food addiction,’ but in fact there is very little research which shows whether or not this might be true,” lead researcher Oren Contreras-Rodríguez says in a statement. “The findings in our study support the idea that the reward processing following food stimuli in obesity is associated with neural changes similar to those found in substance addiction.

“This still needs to be viewed as an association between food craving behavior and brain changes, rather than one necessarily causing the other.”

I’m not convinced that you can treat cases of Obesity the same as Drug or Alcohol addiction. I still believe that people are taught to eat what they eat. It could be more like indoctrination. A type of learning over years and years of repetition.

WebMD Health News

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About ray0369

I'M RETIRE, I'VE TRAVELED TO MORE THEN TWO DOZEN COUNTRIES, SOME AS MANY AS 5 TIMES. I LOVE TO WRITE BUT EVEN MORE, I'M SOMEONE WHO HAS ALWAYS WORKED OUT. I HAVE DONE ENDLESS RESEARCH ON THE SUBJECT OF FITNESS. SO WHEN I DECIDED TO WRITE A BLOG IT WAS ONLY NATURE THAT I WRITE ABOUT MY FAVORITE SUBJECT.
This entry was posted in diet, eating healthy, health and fitness, losing weight, Uncategorized, WEIGHT LOSE and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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